Category Archives: Uncategorized

Sleep and Dream Researcher Allan Hobson

Noted Dream, Sleep Researcher Allan Hobson at LSC

Dr. Allan Hobson believes that the “most informative and reliable teacher is oneself.” The Harvard Medical School-trained psychiatrist will describe how he reached this conclusion when he delivers an afternoon lecture at Lyndon State College on April 30. Hobson’s major research interests are the neurophysiological basis of the mind and behavior; sleep and dreaming; and the history of neurology and psychiatry. He lectures throughout the world on consciousness, sleep and dreaming.

Hobson is a member of the Boylston Medical Society and has received many awards and honors including a Distinguished Scientist Award from the Sleep Research Society. Hobson has served on numerous national and regional medical committees, and has been on the editorial board of several medical journals. He was a professor of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School and directed the Laboratory of Neurophysiology at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center in Boston from 1968 to 2003. He has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and 10 books on sleep, dreaming and consciousness. In 2004, Harvard Medical School awarded Hobson for his lifetime dedication to sleep research.

Hobson has kept a dream journal for more than 50 years and will be sharing examples during the lecture. He will demonstrate how his “subjective conscious experience” has informed his recent theories about the self, the mind, and the brain.

Hobson asserts that one can glean more from fellow students than what one can learn in class. “Fifty years from now you will remember these social interactions as if they had occurred yesterday, whereas you will forget almost everything that you were taught in formal course work,” Hobson said. “In my lecture at LSC, I will assert that each of us is his own consciousness laboratory and that we can learn as much from ourselves and our associates as we can learn in a classroom. That’s what the title means. I am not opposed to science or religion but I am opposed to reliance on all received ideas. We need to move beyond science and religion toward self-discovery.”

Hobson will invite attendees to make “self-observations” and share them with him either via e-mail or through a visit to his farm in East Burke, Vt., home to his Dreamstage Brain and Sleep Science Museum.

Hobson’s lecture will be in the Burke Mountain Room on the fourth floor of the Samuel Read Hall Library and Academic Center at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public. The presentation, part of Lyndon State College’s Spring 2014 Lecture and Arts Series, is sponsored by Hayes Ford and Vermont Broadcast Associates. The Series is made possible in part by the Harriett M. Sherman Lecture Fund.

 

Ben Falk in a Vermont rice paddy.

Nationally Recognized Author Ben Falk to Speak

Ben Falk is the founder of Whole System Design, a Vermont-based landscape consulting firm that offers permaculture design courses and other “reskill” trainings to equip people with the capacity to grow their own food, medicine, and fuel. Falk’s permaculture Whole Systems Research Farm has drawn national attention for its wide array of fruit trees, rice paddies (relatively unheard of in the Northeast), ducks, nuts, and earth-inspired buildings. He is the author of The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach.

Falk will lecture at Lyndon State College as part of the college’s Earth Day activities, Tuesday, April 22 at 11 a.m.

Falk will discuss how to develop durable, beautiful, and highly functional human habitat systems fit to handle an age of rapid transition. According to Falk, “The core of the challenge is how to live adaptably because it’s easier and more enjoyable to learn to start doing these things now before we’re forced to.”

Falk and his team have been testing strategies at the Whole Systems Research Farm over the past decade, as well as experimenting on other sites Falk has designed through his off-farm consulting business.

By imitating natural systems, Falk hopes to inspire would-be homesteaders—especially those who find themselves with unlikely farming land—to make the most of what they have by re-imagining what’s possible. His demonstration of combustion-free hot water can be seen at youtube.com/watch?v=Z3Z003uBn9Q

Falk will speak at 11 a.m. in the Moore Community Room, Academic and Student Activity Center (ASAC) Room 100. The lecture is free and open to the public and is sponsored by LSC’s Social Science Department.

Lyndon State College’s Lecture and Arts Series is sponsored by Hayes Ford and Vermont Broadcast Associates. It is made possible in part by the Harriet M. Sherman Lecture Fund.

Participants in the 2013 iWOW Entrepreneur Camp

2014 Summer Camps for Ages 6–18 Announced

Children need to use their summer break in a healthy, productive way. A good summer camp improves skills and nurtures a child’s growth and maturity. The 2014 summer camps at Lyndon State College use a fun and relaxed environment to help develop a child’s capacities for self-confidence, self-esteem, independence, leadership, and making friends. These lifelong skills are the part of the LSC summer camp experience. This summer’s roster includes camps for music, science, business, and sports.

Rock & Roll Recording Camp is a hands-on intensive program to explore the world of songwriting and recording by bringing together students with musical passion and ability. The one-week overnight camp runs July 12–19 and attendance is limited to 20 students—incoming high school freshman to high school seniors or recent high school graduates.

The camp will teach the “ins and outs” of the music industry, provide in-depth recording sessions using Pro Tools, and allow attendees to gain fundamental songwriting skills. Activities include daily workshops, band practices, group activities, and special outside performances. Students are encouraged to bring instruments and have a willingness to work with others. Campers will put on a special outdoor lunch and performance at the end of the week; parents and family are welcome to attend.

Future science, technology, engineering and math leaders will enjoy the mix of hands-on academic workshops and adventure during the week-long STEM Exploration Camp to explore possible careers in the STEM fields. A different STEM discipline will be introduced and explored each day in workshops with experts from the fields of atmospheric science, biology, geology, natural sciences and physics. The day camp runs August 4–8 and is limited to 15 students who will be entering the 6th, 7th, or 8th grade in the fall.

During the PIEEP (Purposeful, Inclusive, Empowering, Ethical, & Process-oriented) Leadership Camp, students entering the 6th, 7th or 8th grade in the fall of 2014 will explore the concept of leadership and identify, enhance and develop leadership skills through interactive exercises and exciting outdoor activities. This week-long, hands-on day camp runs July 21–25; attendance is limited to 15 students.

Developed in partnership with Lyndon Institute, the week-long Maker Camp targets students entering the 6th, 7th or 8th grade in the fall of 2014 who are interested in creating, designing, inventing, tinkering, hacking, engineering, and making things with their hands. Hands-on projects and activities will take full advantage of the sophisticated resources available at Lyndon Institute such as 3D printing, welding, laser etching, and more. The day camp runs July 28–August 1; attendance is limited to 15 students.

The iWOW Entrepreneur Camp is a day camp to learn how to start and operate a business. The camp runs July 14–18; attendance is limited to 15 students entering the 6th, 7th or 8th grade in the fall.

IWOW Entrepreneur Camp 2.0 provides the tools, strategies, and the confidence needed to assess the marketplace, identify opportunities, and develop new businesses. Campers will build upon their existing business knowledge to tackle common dilemmas that face start-up businesses. The camp runs July 14–18; attendance is limited to 20 students entering the 8th or 9th grade or those who completed the iWOW Youth Entrepreneur Camp 2013.

The STEM, PIEEP, Maker, and both Entrepreneur camps are sponsored by the Center for Rural Entrepreneurship and include daily activities with LSC’s renowned adventure program at no extra cost. Campers can use the high and low ropes course, indoor climbing center, disc golf, on-campus mountain bike trails, and swimming pool.

LSC’s nationally recognized Atmospheric Sciences Department will again host their Weekend Weather Camp for students entering the 7th, 8th, or 9th grade. It is a day camp format: students arrive on campus Saturday, August 2 morning, leave campus after activities conclude on Saturday afternoon, and then return to campus on Sunday, August 3 morning. Attendance is limited to 20 students.

The camp will involve a variety of classroom and lab activities. Topics include cloud identification, severe weather, and climate change. There will be a weather balloon launch and an exercise in TV weathercasting. On the second day of the camp, students will give presentations regarding what they have learned. Parents will be encouraged to attend the presentations. Activities conclude Sunday afternoon with a barbecue for campers, parents, and camp staff. For more information, see meteorology.lyndonstate.edu/weathercamp/ or contact LSC Weather Camp Director Lawrence Hayes at Lawrence.Hayesiii@lyndonstate.edu or 802 626-6254.

The Hornet Hoop Camp for Girls is a complete basketball camp that combines excellent instruction for campers from 8–18 at any ability level with an enjoyable camp experience. The staff teaches skills, concepts, and basketball fundamentals—both team and individual—which the campers practice in hands-on drills and game situations. The campers will develop individual skills including shooting, passing, dribbling, ball handling, rebounding, and footwork. The camp runs July 7–11.

The Hornet Hoop Camp for Boys is a comprehensive basketball camp that combines excellent instruction for campers from 8–18 at any ability level with an enjoyable camp experience. The staff teaches skills, concepts, and basketball fundamentals—both team and individual—which the campers practice in hands-on drills and game situations. The camp runs July 21–25.

The LSC Summer Baseball Camp is designed for campers to learn the fundamentals of the game, improve their skills, and to enjoy and have fun playing baseball. Campers will be placed into age appropriate groups and will work on all facets of the game. The camp runs June 23–26 and is intended for girls and boys from age 6–14.

A half-day “pro-style” Exposure Baseball Clinic for high school boys, grades 9–12, will be on Saturday, August 2 from 9 a.m.–1 p.m. The rain date is Sunday, August 3. This clinic features a variety of experienced coaches from across the region including LSC Head Baseball Coach Tom White and his coaching staff. There will be primary position instruction followed by batting practice; 60-yard dash; infield, outfield, catcher, and pitcher evaluations. Collegiate coaches that will be attending will be named at a later date.

For more information or to register for any camp, visit lyndonstate.edu/summercamps.

 

Carol A. and Thomas E. Moore

Moore Community Room to be Dedicated, April 15

The Vermont State College’s Board of Trustees approved Lyndon State College President Joe Bertolino’s request to rename the multipurpose room in the Academic and Student Activity Center on the LSC campus. The room commonly referred to as ASAC 100, will be named The Carol A. and Thomas E. Moore Community Room. The dedication and ribbon cutting will be April 15 at 12:30 p.m.

Carol A. Moore stepped down in 2011 after thirteen years as LSC president. During her presidency, 15 new academic programs were added and the Patrick and Marcelle Leahy Center for Rural Students was created. Moore secured Lyndon’s first two $1 million gifts—as part of The Second Century Campaign—and oversaw the construction of two buildings, the Rita Bole Complex in 2005 and the Academic and Student Activity Center in 2009. Moore is the Executive Director of NorthWoods Stewardship Center. In 2012, she was named Director of Strategic Initiatives and served in that capacity until becoming Executive Director.

Tom Moore was an educational leader and innovative dean of Northeastern University’s College of Business Administration. Under his leadership, CBA initiated the Bachelor of Science in International Business (BSIB) program, which has partnerships with universities in seven different countries. He championed the Social Enterprise Institute, which enables students to develop microfinance projects in impoverished regions of the world. Moore designed and launched an online MBA program — which today is recognized as one of the world’s best. He served honorably as a retired Commander of the U.S. Navy and veteran of the Vietnam War. Moore died in June 2011.

Bertolino said, “This represents only a sampling of what each of these leaders accomplished in their lives. Central to both of their professional and personal accomplishments is their commitment to student learning and growth. As such, I see it as immensely appropriate to name the room in their honor.”

The public is invited to the ribbon cutting, dedication, and the reception which will immediately follow the 12:30 p.m. ceremony. For more information, contact Darcie Miles at 802 626-6404 or darcie.miles@lyndonstate.edu..

Krissy Pozatek

Krissy Pozatek to Give Book Lecture, April 3

How do we build resilient children who can handle life’s challenges? Parents often feel their role is to protect their children from the world: to cushion them when they fall, to lift them over obstacles, and to remove sharp rocks from their path. But controlling a child’s entire environment and keeping all pain at bay isn’t feasible. “The solution is not removing impediments from our children’s lives,” writes Krissy Pozatek, “it is compassionately encouraging them to be brave. You can’t prepare the world for your children, so instead you should focus on preparing your children for the world.”

This is Pozatek’s message in her new book, Brave Parenting: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Raising Emotionally Resilient Children. And she’ll bring that message to Lyndon State College in a free lecture on Thursday, April 3.

According to Pozatek, “If kids face small hurdles, small pains, at a young age and learn to overcome these obstacles, they will be much better equipped to face larger trouble later in life. Early lessons in problem solving teach self-confidence and self-reliance—and show us that kids are tougher than we think.”

Pozatek has had fifteen years of experience in the wilderness therapy and adolescent treatment field and a graduate degree in clinical social work from both Smith College School for Social Work and at N.M. Highlands University. Her clinical experience includes the treatment of depression, anxiety, dual diagnosis, adoption issues, trauma, self-harming behavior, substance abuse, personality disorders, and family system problems. Pozatek draws her lessons from her experience guiding children in wilderness therapy and from her Buddhist practice.

She is the author of The Parallel Process: Growing Alongside Your Adolescent or Young Adult Child in Treatment and works as a parent coach with parents of struggling adolescents and young adults through her coaching practice. She also conducts parent workshops, seminars, lectures, and recently was a visiting professor at Middlebury College.

Pozatek will speak at 7 p.m. in the Rita Bole Community Room; the lecture is free and open to the public. This talk is part of Lyndon State’s Lecture and Arts series and is sponsored by Hayes Ford and Vermont Broadcast Associates. The series is made possible in part by the Harriet M. Sherman Lecture Fund.

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Author Zach Wahls to Speak About “His Two Moms”

When then-nineteen-year-old Eagle Scout Zach Wahls addressed the Iowa House of Representatives in 2011, what he had to say sparked conversation across the internet and the country. The son of a same-sex couple, he told the Judiciary Committee that, “the sexual orientation of my parents has had zero effect on the content of my character.” The video of his testimony went viral and has subsequently received more than 18 million views on YouTube. It helped land him interviews on John Stewart’s The Daily Show and Ellen to advance his message. On March 27, Wahls comes to Lyndon State College to raise the question, “What Makes a Family?”

Wahls’ book, My Two Moms: Lessons of Love, Strength, and What Makes a Family, was published in 2012. His message is one of reassurance—whether to same-sex couples, their children, and anyone who has ever felt like an outsider. Wahls travels the country talking to many different audiences about his self-described “rather boring” experience growing up with two lesbian mothers, why the struggle for LGBTQ rights is so important, and where he thinks the fight goes from here. He works with a number of different LGBTQ rights groups in a consulting role and continues to work on protecting and advancing those rights at home in Iowa.

Wahls’ talk is in the Moore Community Room/Academic and Student Activity Center (ASAC) Room 100 at 8 p.m. It is free and open to the public. His appearance is presented by Lyndon State College’s Campus Activities Board.

 

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Big Turnout Expected for Saturday’s Veterans Summit

Hundreds of veterans, their family members, and over 50 exhibitors are expected this Saturday, March 15, at the 2nd Annual NEK Veterans Summit at Lyndon State College.

The day-long event brings veterans, their families, and veteran service organizations together to build relationships, strengthen connections, and enhance the regional support network. The Lyndon State College Veterans Club hosts the event in partnership with the LSC Veterans Student Support Committee

Major Adam Sacchetti, the Inspector-Instructor for Company A, 1st Battalion, 25th Marines, Brunswick, Maine, will deliver the opening address at 9:30 a.m. in the Alexander Twilight Theatre. He has seen combat action in the Kandahar and Oruzgan Provinces of Afghanistan and in Fallujah, Iraq. As 2nd Platoon Commander for the 2nd Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) Company, Sacchetti was deployed to Naval Stations Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and Rota, Spain. He graduated with distinction from Expeditionary Warfare School, and then assumed duties as the Commanding Officer of Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines.

Sacchetti’s awards include the Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device, the Purple Heart Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and the Combat Action Ribbon.

The Keynote Speaker D. Wayne Robinson, president and chief executive officer of Student Veterans of America, follows the opening address. Robinson rose to the rank of command sergeant major in the U.S. Army and graduated from every enlisted leadership course offered by the Army. He served as the liaison and operations sergeant for Delta Force. He has over 39 awards recognizing his valuable contributions including the Order of Saint Barbara, the Glen E. Morrell Medallion, and six Meritorious Service Medals.

Deborah Amdur, director of the White River Junction VA Medical Center, will deliver the Summit address at 1 p.m. Amdur will discuss developments taking place at the White River Junction VA Medical Center which will enhance services to veterans; she will also take questions from the audience. Prior to coming to Vermont, she was chief consultant for Care Management and Social Work Service with overall responsibility for five national programs in the Department of Veterans Affairs: National Social Work, Caregiver Support, Family Hospitality, Post Deployment Care Management, and the VA Liaison Program.

Special guest, Information Technician Master Chief Petty Officer Margaret Buckingham of the Naval Network Warfare Command, will speak at 2:30 p.m.

In conjunction with both the Summit and college’s Annual Cultural Festival, the Nulhegan Drummers of the Abenaki Nation will take to the stage in the Alexander Twilight Theatre from 3 to 4:15 p.m. The group will play veterans, warrior, and healing songs to “honor veterans in song and spirit.” The event is in the Alexander Twilight Theatre and is free and open to the public. Additionally, Chief Don Stevens will moderate one of the afternoon break-out sessions during the Summit. He will discuss warrior traditions, tribal war history, and warrior songs.

There will be a variety of breakout sessions offered throughout the day including “PTSD and TBI,” “therapy dogs and PTSD,” “women veterans,” “veterans employment benefits and opportunities,” “government consulting and entrepreneurship,” “navigating veterans benefits,” “education benefits 101 for student veterans,” and a “student veterans panel.” A free lunch will be provided to all registrants.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will be hosting a one-day “stand down” as part of the summit. A stand down is a community-based intervention program designed to help homeless veterans. The stand down is a collaborative event involving community providers who help connect homeless veterans with needed food, shelter, clothing, health screenings, and VA and Social Security benefits counseling.

A Mobile Vet Center will be on campus for the summit. The Vet Center, a 30 foot long bus, is operated by the White River Junction Vet Center. It provides readjustment counseling and information resources to combat veterans. More than 50 veteran service organizations will have information booths providing a one-stop-shop for veterans services, clubs, and resources.

To register or to learn more, visit http://www.lyndonstate.edu/VeteransSummit. For more information, contact LSC Veterans Club advisor Thom Anderson at Thomas.Anderson@lyndonstate.edu. or 802 626.6208.

In affiliation with the summit, the LSC Veterans Club, Q Burke, and the LSC Ski & Ride Club are sponsoring the first annual Ian Muller Rail Jam March 14 at Mid-Burke Lodge. All proceeds go to the Ian Muller Memorial Scholarship; an annual $1,000 scholarship to an LSC student veteran. A former ski instructor at Burke Mountain, Muller was killed during combat operations in Helmand Provence, Afghanistan, in March, 2011. Muller often volunteered to take the dangerous lead position during combat patrols; he said he did it because many of his colleagues had wives and children, and he did not. Donations to the scholarship can be made by contacting Sara Lussier at LSC at 802 626-6426 or sara.lussier@lyndonstate.edu.

 >> Unable to attend the event? You can still support our veterans.

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Rail Jam at Q Burke for Ian Muller Memorial Scholarship

Corporal Ian Muller picked the Marines because, in his words, it’s the “toughest and most elite” of the military branches. He knew the dangers that came with his choice and was dedicated to his job and fellow Marines. Muller, a Danville, Vt., native, was sent to Afghanistan, where often volunteered to take the more dangerous lead position during combat patrols. He said he did it because many of his colleagues had wives and children, and he did not.

Muller died March 11, 2011 while conducting combat operations supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was 22 years old. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force; Camp Lejeune, N.C.

In conjunction with the 2nd Annual Veterans Summit, the Lyndon State College Veterans Club, Q Burke Mountain Resort, and the LSC Ski & Ride Club are sponsoring the Ian Muller Rail Jam March 14 at Mid-Burke Lodge. There will be a beer tent, food, and prizes for spectators and competitors. All proceeds from the event and the beer and food tents will go to the Ian Muller Memorial Scholarship; an annual $1,000 scholarship to an LSC student veteran. Muller attended LSC prior to enlisting in the Marine Corps, he also taught skiing at Burke Mountain.

Registration begins at 4:30 p.m.; there is a registration fee of $5. The competition begins at 5 p.m. An après ski party featuring the music of Lem Genovese will be held at the Bear Den Lounge from 7-9 p.m. Donations are suggested for the après ski party. Genovese is a US Army/Iowa guard veteran of both Vietnam and Desert Storm where he served as a combat field medic with the 209th Med Clearing Company attached to the 2nd Brigade of the 1st Infantry Division. His four decades of song writing, nationwide performing, and recording reflects his mission statement—“to build a musical bridge of awareness, compassion and healing to our nation and its military families.”

Additionally, Q Burke Mountain Resort, headed by Army veteran Ary Quiros, is offering free lift tickets all day March 14 to veterans and their families. Proof of military service is required for the free tickets.

Questions about the rail jam should be directed to Q Burke Guest Services at 802 626-7300. Donations to the scholarship can be made by contacting LSC’s Sara Lussier at 802 626-6426 or sara.lussier@lyndonstate.edu. The college will match gifts of $1,000 or more.

 >> Unable to attend the event? You can still support our veterans.

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Annual Cultural Festival, March 6-15

Lyndon State College kicks off its 18th Annual Cultural Festival on March 6. The Festival, a campus-wide event traditionally held during the second and third weeks of March, is an opportunity for LSC to celebrate diversity and enjoy activities from a broad range of cultures. This year’s festival runs from March 6–15.

Slam poet Carlos Andrés Gómez, an award-winning poet, actor, and writer, performs on Thursday, March 6. He is the author of the 2012 coming-of-age memoir Man Up: Reimagining Modern Manhood. Gómez was nominated for the Pushcart Prize and named Artist of the Year at the 2009 Promoting Outstanding Writers Awards. He costarred in Spike Lee’s Inside Man with Denzel Washington and Jodie Foster and appeared in the sixth season of HBO’s Russell Simmons Presents Def Poetry. Gómez will perform at 9 p.m., in the Moore Community Room/Academic Student and Activity Center (ASAC) Room 100. The event is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the Campus Activity Board (CAB) as part of the Arts and Lecture series.

March 13 opens with a Peace Corps presentation by LSC Professor Thom Anderson. Anderson served in the Peace Corps from 1991 to 1995 in Morocco working to establish a National Park to protect the endangered Barbary sheep. He implemented solar ovens and fuel efficient cook stoves to help reduce the amount of wood used for cooking and heating to help stem the effects of deforestation, desertification, and soil erosion. Anderson’s talk is at 11 a.m. in Library and Academic Center Room 412.

Later that day, Fulbright Scholar and LSC Professor Margaret Sheerer will present highlights of living and working in Kerala, India—particularly as experienced by a woman—in light of the highly-publicized sexual assaults and other forms of violence against girls and women. Sherrer’s talk is at 12:30 in Vail 403.

Thursday ends with a 6 p.m. screening—in association with Vermont Public Television—of the documentary American Promise, winner of the 2013 Sundance Film Festival’s Special Jury Award. The film documents 13 years in the lives of two African-American families as they pursue the promise of opportunity through the education of their sons. Joe Brewster and Michèle Stephenson filmed their son, Idris, and his best friend, Seun, as they made their way through a prestigious private school. The film presents complicated truths about America’s struggle on issues of race, class and opportunity. The film will be screened in the Rita Bole Community Room and is free and open to the public. Following the film, a panel of racial justice activists including Sha’an Mouliert, Noah Fink, Penny Patch, and Paul Marcus, will respond to the film and lead audience discussion. Contact Pat Shine at 802 626-6252 or patricia.shine@lyndonstate.edu with any questions about the screening.

The festival week culminates Saturday, March 15 with The Nulhegan Abenaki Drummers: Honoring Veterans in Song and Spirit. The drummers combine traditional northeastern music with the sound of the big powwow style drum. Held in conjunction with the college’s 2nd annual Veterans Summit, the drummers—many of them veterans—will take the Alexander Twilight Theatre stage at 3 p.m. “The Nulhegan people have occupied the NEK and surrounding areas for thousands of years under various tribal leaders,” according to Chief Don Stevens. “We drum for ourselves and invite others to listen. Whenever we drum, we always honor our veterans and their families. There are special songs for veterans and special protocols we observe. When we do certain veterans songs, we ask that people refrain from pictures and video—we will announce it beforehand. This is done so that the souls of those departed will not be captured and trapped in the image.” The event is free and open to the public.

The annual Cultural Festival, created and coordinated by LSC Professor Lori Werdenschlag, presents a broad variety of performances and events again this year. The NEK Veterans Summit; a rail jam; lectures on the intersection of Mayan culture, calendars, and mathematics; and an international food court round out the offerings.

» Complete Cultural Festival Schedule

 

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2nd Annual NEK Veterans Summit at Lyndon State March 15

The Lyndon State College Veterans Club, in partnership with the LSC Veterans Student Support Committee and other veteran service organizations, will be hosting the 2nd Annual NEK Veterans Summit at the college on Saturday, March 15. The purpose is to bring veterans, their families, and veteran service organizations together to build relationships, strengthen connections, and enhance the regional support network.

Deborah Amdur, director of the White River Junction VA Medical Center, will deliver the opening address at 9:30 a.m. Amdur will discuss developments taking place at the White River Junction VA Medical Center which will enhance services to veterans; she will also take questions from the audience. Prior to coming to Vermont, she was chief consultant for Care Management and Social Work Service with overall responsibility for five national programs in the Department of Veterans Affairs: National Social Work, Caregiver Support, Family Hospitality, Post Deployment Care Management, and the VA Liaison Program.

The Keynote Speaker is D. Wayne Robinson, president and chief executive officer of Student Veterans of America. Robinson rose to the rank of command sergeant major in the U.S. Army and graduated from every enlisted leadership course offered by the Army. He served as the liaison and operations sergeant for Delta Force. He has over 39 awards recognizing his valuable contributions including the Order of Saint Barbara, the Glen E. Morrell Medallion, and six Meritorious Service Medals.

He was previously a partner and head of New Business Development at Drexel Hamilton Investment Partners, a veteran-owned Wall Street firm that provides investment advisory and management services. Robinson received an MBA from The University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business and is a graduate of Wall Street Warfighters; a program that helps high-potential service-disabled veterans transition into finance roles.

There will be a variety of breakout sessions offered throughout the day including “PTSD and TBI,” “therapy dogs and PTSD,” “women veterans,” “veterans employment benefits and opportunities,” “government consulting and entrepreneurship,” “navigating veterans benefits, education benefits 101 for student veterans,” and a student veterans panel.” A free lunch will be provided to all registrants. Closing remarks are at 2:30 p.m., followed by one last chance to connect with service organizations.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will be hosting a one-day “stand down” as part of the summit. A stand down is a community-based intervention program designed to help homeless veterans. According to the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans, the program has become recognized as the most valuable outreach tool to help homeless veterans. The stand down is a collaborative event involving community providers who help connect homeless veterans with needed food, shelter, clothing, health screenings, and VA and Social Security benefits counseling. It also provides referrals to other necessary services such as housing, employment and substance abuse treatment.

A Mobile Vet Center will be on campus for the summit. The Vet Center is a 30 foot long bus and is operated by the White River Junction Vet Center. It provides readjustment counseling and information resources to combat veterans. Like community-based veteran centers, Mobile Vet Centers focus on services that help combat veterans make the transition between military and civilian life.

More than 40 veteran service organizations will have information booths providing a one-stop-shop for veterans services, clubs, and resources.

Advance registration for the summit is required; attendance is limited to 300 participants. To register or to learn more, visit http://www.lyndonstate.edu/VeteransSummit. For more information, contact LSC Veterans Club advisor Thom Anderson at 802 626.6208 or Thomas.Anderson@lyndonstate.edu.

In conjunction with the summit, the LSC Veterans Club, Q Burke, and the LSC Ski & Ride Club are sponsoring the first annual Ian Muller Rail Jam March 14 at Mid-Burke Lodge. All proceeds go to the Ian Muller Memorial Scholarship; an annual $1,000 scholarship to an LSC student veteran. Q Burke, headed by Army veteran Ary Quiros, is offering free lift tickets all day March 14 to veterans and their families.

Ian Muller, a Danville, Vt., native, attended LSC prior to enlisting in the Marine Corps. An avid bodybuilder, athlete, and ski instructor at Burke Mountain, Muller was killed during combat operations in Helmand Provence, Afghanistan, in March, 2011. Muller often volunteered to take the dangerous lead position during combat patrols; he said he did it because many of his colleagues had wives and children, and he did not. Donations to the scholarship can be made by contacting Sara Lussier at Lyndon State College, 802 626-6426 or sara.lussier@lyndonstate.edu

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Math Counts at MATHCOUNTS

The Northeast Vermont Chapter of MATHCOUNTS held its annual competition at Lyndon State College on February 15 with middle school students participating from five area schools. The students competed individually and in teams. The winning team was from U-32 coached by Mary Ellen Simmons and Kate McCann. The Thaddeus Stevens School team took second place with Jon Snyder as coach. Bronze went to St. Paul’s Catholic School, coached by Madalyn Ledoux.

Brian Lamar from Thaddeus Stevens took first place in the individual competition and in the “countdown” round. The countdown round is an exciting event where audience members can see the questions as two students race each other – - and a 45-second timer – - to answer math questions with only pencil, paper, and brain power. The second place countdown trophy went to Noah Witke from U-32. Other students participating in the countdown round were: Sam Darmstadt (U-32), Mason Castle (Thaddeus Stevens), Jerico Ladd (St Paul’s), Frances Kaplan (U-32), Ryan Montgomery (Danville with coach Tiffany Santy), Parker Morse (U-32), Alesis Degreenia (Miller’s Run with coaches Ham and Blodgett), Brandon Brunnell (Miller’s Run), and Benjamin Bangs (Thaddeus Stevens).

The top two teams will go to the state competition at Vermont Technical College on March 29. The other students participating in the countdown round will also be invited to the state competition based on their winning individual scores.

The local MATHCOUNTS competition couldn’t happen without the combined efforts of many people. The coaches work with their students all year long to prepare. On the day of the competition, parents, teachers, former competitors, and coaches pitch in to help coordinator Daisy McCoy, a math professor at Lyndon State College, run the event.

 

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Kevin Mahoney Presents “First Ascents Across the Globe”

Lyndon State College’s Adventure Speaker Series continues March 5 with a free lecture by Kevin Mahoney. The talk is titled “New Hampshire to Nepal: First Ascents across the Globe.” Mahoney will discuss first ascents from a variety of conditions and sites: from nearby Lake Willoughby and Cannon Cliff to the more remote locales of Alaska and Nepal.

Mahoney taught rock climbing and mountaineering courses for the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) for six years before he decided to start his own business, Mahoney Alpine Adventures. This decision led him to seek his full international certification through the IFMGA/UIAGM (International Federation of Mountain Guides Associations/Union Internationale des Associations de Guides de Montagnes). Mahoney is certified in all 3 disciplines: ski mountaineering, rock, and alpine climbing. He has also instructed courses for the American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) and is a Wilderness First Responder.

In 2010, he received the Copp/Dash Inspire Award and the Lyman Spitzer Award for an alpine-style ascent of the south face of Nupste in Nepal.

The lecture begins at 6 p.m. in the Moore Community Room/ASAC (Academic and Student Activities Center) Room 100. It is free and open to the public. Mahoney’s lecture concludes the series for the semester; new lectures are planned for the fall.

Lyndon State College’s Adventure Speaker Series is sponsored by the LSC Lecture & Arts Series, Kingdom Adventures Mountain Guides, LLC, Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, and The American Alpine Club.

 

Dressed for Success at LSC, March 12

Seeking Clothing Donations to Aid Job-Seeking Students

It’s an age-old problem for people trying to enter the workforce: without a job, how can you afford a suit? But without a suit, how can you get a job?

To help solve this dilemma, Lyndon State College, in cooperation with the Center for Rural Entrepreneurship (CRE), is holding its 3rd annual “Dressed for Success” event on Wednesday, March 12 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the college’s Moore Community Room/Academic and Student Activity Center (ASAC) room 100.

The goal of the project is to provide a free business-ready outfit to each junior and senior who attends the event. These clothes become a foundation for the student’s professional wardrobe and may be worn to interviews, presentations, internships, and in other professional circumstances. The needs of juniors and seniors will be prioritized but all LSC students are welcome to participate.

All merchandise will be received by donation. The group seeks donations of suits, sport coats and blazers, jackets, overcoats and dress coats, dress shirts and blouses, trousers and slacks, skirts and dresses, and shoes. The group also seeks other relevant professional attire and accessories such as scarves, ties, belts, costume jewelry, briefcases, portfolios and attaché cases. Clothing should be clean and gently worn.

Donations may be dropped off at the ASAC reception desk Monday–Friday from 8 a.m.–4 p.m. through March 10. Donations are also accepted at two off-campus locations this year: Moore’s Dry Cleaners in Newport, Vt., and Palmer Brothers Cleaners in St. Johnsbury. All donors will receive a discount coupon from the Pizza Man.

There are other changes this year: stylists from Shear Sensations will be offering professional hair styling and makeup application tips during the event and this year’s “fashion show” models will dress in styles appropriate for a variety of occupations to reflect the fact that not every LSC graduate will need to dress in a suit for work.

Tara Lynn, owner and designer of Tara Lynn Bridal, will give a presentation at 2:30 p.m. about the professional habits and dress that prospective employers look for and how to make a good first impression. She is also lending her dress forms for the event. Seamstress Lorraine Brown will be back to measure collar, sleeve, and inseam measurements. JC Penney will provide clothing racks and hangers. Clothing remaining after the event will be donated to NEK Youth Services and Helping Other People Everyday (H.O.P.E.).

Lyndon State College’s Center for Rural Entrepreneurship coordinates the event as a component of the college’s Commencement Fair. For additional information, contact Christina Cotnoir, CRE assistant director, at (802) 626-6747 or christina.cotnoir@lyndonstate.edu.

Chinese Journalism Students Visiting LSC

Three Week Residency to Observe How American Colleges Teach Journalism

Lyndon State College is playing host for three weeks to five students from Beijing Foreign Studies University. The students, chosen by the university on the basis of interest and English ability, are all majoring in journalism. The three graduate students and two sophomores are here to attend classes in Lyndon’s award-winning Electronic Journalism Arts (EJA) program and observe how a college in America teaches journalism. The greatest value of the program lies in the students’ opportunity to experience the hands-on daily production of News7 and NewsLINC—student-produced newscasts are rare in Chinese academia.

They arrived on the Lyndon campus on January 20 and are slated to leave February 9. This is the first visit to the United States for all of the students.

The idea for the program was hatched when LSC Journalism Professor Dan Williams gave a guest lecture last year at Beijing Foreign Studies University as part of his year-long Fulbright Scholar stint in China. Williams remained in touch with a professor at the University and sent him a description of LSC’s program last fall. That coincided with a visit by Trevor Barski, the international student specialist in LSC’s Admissions Office. EJA Professor Meaghan Meachem developed the three-week program when she visited Shanghai International Studies University in spring 2013.

The plan came together faster than expected according to Williams: “We were actually surprised when we heard they were sending some students for spring semester. We anticipated schools wouldn’t be able to coordinate everything that quickly.” He hopes to expand the program as well. “We’ve made the program available to two other universities: Xi’an International Studies University, and Shanghai International Studies University.”

The students spent their first weekend sightseeing in New York City. A trip to Burlington, snowboard lessons, and a Chinese New Year celebration are also planned. The students are staying with host families and each of them has a student mentor from the EJA program.

Visiting student Shang Yiran notes that Lyndon’s “professors are so humorous and interesting. Everybody is friendly and sweet.” Wang Siqi finds that “campus life is so different from that in China,” where “classes are more restrictive and structured.”

The program is a good fit for these five students according to Williams, “All of them want to go into journalism after graduation; mostly television. One is interested in magazines. Another cannot make up her mind yet. Plus, it’s cool to be in America.”

Climber Silas Rossi Presents “Train Local; Go Global”

Adventure Speaker Series Continues, February 12

Lyndon State College’s highly successful Adventure Speaker Series continues on February 12 when Silas Rossi presents “Train Local; Go Global.” Rossi’s lecture will address training and mountain climbing in New England—and then taking those skills to the greater ranges in the world.

Much of Rossi’s life, both personal and professional, has been spent seeking out high and wild places. Based in New York’s Shawangunk Mountains (known to adventurers far and wide as “The Gunks”), Rossi is an alpine climber at heart, and spends much of the year climbing and guiding in the greater mountain ranges around the country and abroad. His favorite destinations include the Italian Dolomites; the French Alps; Papua, New Guinea; and Alaska—where he has put up significant first ascents. Nonetheless, Rossi appreciates the diversity and easy access of the climbing and skiing found in the Northeast. The many cliffs and crags serve as a year ‘round office and playground, as well as an excellent training ground for regular expeditions to bigger ranges around the world. Katahdin, Maine’s highest point, and Acadia National Park, keeps Rossi returning to Maine each year.

Rossi is owner of Alpine Logic, LLC, and teaches professional guide training courses for the American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA). Rossi is an AIARE (American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education) Level I avalanche educator and an internationally certified IFMGA/UIAGM (International Federation of Mountain Guides Associations/Union Internationale des Associations de Guides de Montagnes) mountain guide. Fewer than 80 people in the United States have this certification.

The lecture begins at 6 p.m. on February 12 in the Moore Community Room/ASAC (Academic and Student Activities Center) Room 100. It is free and open to the public. The Adventure Series continues on March 5 when climber Kevin Mahoney discusses first ascents across the globe. Lyndon State College’s Adventure Speaker Series is sponsored by the LSC Lecture & Arts Series, Kingdom Adventures Mountain Guides, LLC, Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, and The American Alpine Club.

Theatre Fundraising Close to Goal

LSC Foundation Continuing Successful “Challenge Match”

Phase two of a three phase renovation to address needed updates to Lyndon State College’s Alexander Twilight Theatre is nearly funded. This phase, requiring a minimum of $40,000, is only $1000 short of goal. Phase two includes dimmers to control new lighting instruments and an architectural control system that allows remote access to house and practice lights. Phase one, which involved the purchase and installation of a modern lighting console, new lighting instruments for the existing circuits, and air conditioning for the lighting booth, was completed in 2012.

To help defray phase two costs, the LSC Alumni Council started the “Take a Seat” program. Theatre seats are purchased with a donation of $100 to $750 and can be purchased by individuals, by a company, or as part of a group. Each purchased seat will have a plaque affixed with the donor’s name. The seat is “owned” for the next five years, when the seats are slated to be replaced.

In November 2013, LSC Foundation board members issued a challenge to the NEK community: the Foundation would match up to $3,000 in gifts to help the Alumni Council raise the last $6,000 of their $40,000 goal. As a result of that challenge, the goal is only $1,000 short. Any community members interested in “taking a seat” are asked to contact Jenny Harris, LSC development officer at jennifer.harris@lyndonstate.edu or visit the theatre fund website. The LSC Foundation and the Alumni Council are trying to reach their goal by January 25, to coincide with the College’s annual Volunteer Celebration.

LSC Foundation challenge matches have a proven track record for fundraising. As a direct result of an earlier challenge match of $25,000, the Promise Scholarship Program received 17 new gifts totaling $25,100 over the course of six months. The Program also received a grant of $50,000 a year for three years from The Canaday Family Foundation. More than $100,000 was raised in 2013 that was directly attributed to the help of the LSC Foundation. The Promise Scholarship helps to provides low-income NEK students who will be among the first in their family to graduate from college with an annual $2,500 – $5,000 scholarship for four years.

The LSC Foundation was founded in 1980 to generate resources that contribute to the artistic, social, cultural and educational development of LSC. It is a community-based, private, nonprofit organization that is maintained by residents of the Northeast Kingdom. The members of the Foundation are committed to the college, proud of the excellent educational opportunities and community services offered, and dedicated to participating in LSC’s future development.

For the past fifty years, the Alexander Twilight Theatre was considered the pinnacle between Montreal and Boston; acts headlining in New York City were routinely booked in Lyndon. The College has kept up with day-to-day maintenance on the Theatre but age has taken its toll.

Kellie Bean Published in Popular “Philosophy and Pop Culture” Series

LSC’s Provost Contributes Essay on “The Daily Show”

Kellie Bean, Lyndon State College’s provost and academic dean, has had an essay published in the latest volume of the Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series, “The Ultimate Daily Show and Philosophy.” Her article, “Keeping It (Hyper) Real: Anchoring in the Age of Fake News,” is in the volume’s first section entitled “Headlines: Faux News is Good News.”

Each volume in the Blackwell series—84 in total–seeks to “get philosophy out of the ivory tower by publishing books about smart popular culture for serious fans.” The books use themes, characters, and ideas from a variety of sources: popular TV shows and comic books, movies, music, video games, and more. Previous books have dealt with “Mad Men,” “Game of Thrones,” “Superman,” “Final Fantasy,” and the band Metallica.

This “Daily Show” volume expands and updates a 2007 version that examines the “philosophical significance of the quintessential ‘fake’ news show of the 21st century” and its spin-off, “The Colbert Report.” The essayists, or as the book calls them, “Senior Philosophical Correspondents,” tackle tough and surprisingly funny questions about politics, religion, and power. Bean’s essay uses the French philosopher Jean Baudrillard’s concepts of “simulacra and simulation” to examine the effect of “The Daily Show” and “The Colbert Report” on the television audience’s view of reality. Baudrillard’s postmodern concepts deal largely with the relationship among images, society, and reality. Bean said she has “been interested in and intrigued by the series since the early 2000’s and has wanted to contribute” to the books on “The Sopranos,” “Dexter,” and “Sex and the City.”

Bean’s appointment as LSC’s provost and dean of academic affairs began July 1. She has spent 25 years in higher education, 19 of them at Marshall University. She has published on the works of Harold Pinter, Samuel Beckett, and Jean François Lyotard. Her book “Post-Backlash Feminism: Women and the Media since Reagan/Bush” was published in 2007. It assesses anti-feminist media coverage, particularly following the Reagan administration and the Clinton-Lewinski affair.

Emeriti Status for Jon Fitch and Richard Portner

Retired Professors Honored by Vermont State Colleges

Two former Lyndon State College professors, Jon Fitch and Richard Portner, have been granted Professor of Humanities Emeritus status. The awards were confirmed through a special vote by the Vermont State College (VSC) Board of Trustees. LSC President Joe Bertolino nominated both candidates for the honor.

Emeritus status is awarded to retired professors who have a recognized record of outstanding teaching, exceptional professional achievement, and have provided extraordinary service to their college. The individual must have a minimum of 10 years of full-time employment with the VSC.

Jon Fitch, Ph.D., a full-time professor of Psychology and Human Services, retired in 2005 after a 30-year stint at Lyndon. His contributions to LSC fall into several broad areas including curriculum development, program development, teaching excellence, and service to the college and community. Fitch developed a wide variety of courses that range from traditional introductory psychology classes to non-traditional offerings such as Mind/Body Consciousness.

He developed and successfully ran the New England School Counselors Institute (NESCI) for twelve years. Institute participant Janice Parsons shared that NESCI “opened the door for later teaching opportunities” including her current position as a faculty member in the Boston University School of Education.

Bertolino added, “Fitch is well-regarded and respected by his colleagues and his former students as an inspiring and caring teacher, mentor, and valued community member”

Jon also volunteers at the Community Restorative Justice Center where, according to program coordinator Neil Favreau, “Fitch’s professional insight – - and ability to calmly navigate [potentially] difficult, unpredictable, and uncomfortable meetings – - [puts] all parties at ease.”

Professor Richard Portner retired in 2006 after 29 years as a faculty member in Television and Theater. He was instrumental in reviving the Theater program at Lyndon and provided countless students with a strong mentor in the arts. In addition to his regular teaching load, Portner directed two main stage productions per year, while teaching and supervising twelve student-directed one-act plays each fall semester. From 1968 to 2006, he was actively involved in the Weathervane Repertory Theater, a not-for-profit professional summer theater in Whitefield, New Hampshire.

Portner was instrumental in acquiring a grant to establish The LINC Project at LSC. LINC was the forerunner of the college’s award-winning daily News7 broadcasts. These telecasts are the capstone experience of the nationally recognized Electronic Journalism Arts major. In 2004 the department received a coveted Emmy for the best college newscast in the nation.

Former student Michael Barlow, now senior director of ESPN Production Operations, wrote that Portner “helped me overcome my fear of public speaking and helped me realize that I could find fulfillment on the stage [as well as] in an editing room.”

After retirement, Portner and his wife established the Richard and Terry Portner Fine & Performing Arts Prize, a scholarship awarded annually to a student active in the arts at Lyndon.

Bertolino added that Portner “is well-regarded by his colleagues and former students for setting the standard in his field.”

Individuals with emeritus status do not receive compensation. However, they are eligible for special assignments by the college for appropriate compensation and/or reimbursement for expenses at the discretion of the President and within the guidelines of the Vermont State Colleges.

 

Electronic Journalism Program 10th Best in U.S.

Recognized for “In-the-Trenches Approach to Teaching”

Lyndon State College’s Electronic Journalism Arts Department has been ranked in the top ten in a survey of the best 25 journalism schools in the United States. The survey was distributed by the trade magazine NewsPro to members of the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA); 1,321 respondents participated.

The University of Missouri at Columbia School of Journalism placed first in the survey. The 105-year-old “J-school” boasts an NBC/CW affiliate, the local National Public Radio station, and a Spanish-language radio program. Lyndon, with a total enrollment of 1,500, was far and away the smallest school to make the list; Missouri boasts 2,250 students in their department and a total enrollment of over 34,000. Columbia University, Northwestern University, Syracuse University, and Arizona State University are among other schools in the top 10.

According to NewsPro, “The Electronic Journalism Arts department at Lyndon State was a surprise entry in the top 10—and, like the Missouri School, favored for its in-the-trenches approach to teaching.” Lyndon is one of a handful of colleges in the county that produce and broadcast a daily televised news program staffed entirely by students.

In addition to the News7 telecasts, students in the department produce content for web, mobile, and print-based media. Together, these real world experiences form Lyndon’s Vermont Center for Community Journalism (VCCJ), the capstone activity for the department’s majors. The program has won over 80 regional and national awards in the last 10 years.

Nearly half of the NewsPro survey respondents listed their professional status as news professionals. Students, non-news professionals, and educators round out the list. One news professional explained, “I’m a graduate of Lyndon State College. The hands-on experience helped me tremendously in the broadcasting industry. I was able to start anchoring and reporting at 21-years-old. The professors are excellent. The student-run live newscast five days a week prepares future journalists.”

In a statement from the department’s faculty, they noted, “The Electronic Journalism Arts department is extremely honored to see Lyndon State College in the top 10 list of leading graduate and undergraduate journalism education programs in the United States – programs with names like Annenburg, Cronkite, Medill, Murrow, and Newhouse. The survey results verify that over the years our graduates have left Lyndon with the skills and work ethic needed to make a positive impression in the industry.”

College President Joe Bertolino added, “Here’s yet another reason I love talking about Lyndon! Hats off to all the hard working students, faculty, and staff for making this happen.”

Interactive Map of EJA Alumni Placements

Industry Awards for LSC EJA Alums

Kerrin Jeromin Named Outstanding Young Alumnae

Burlington Area Meteorologist Garners Annual Award

Kerrin Jeromin has been named the winner of Lyndon State College’s 2013 Outstanding Young Alumni Award. The award highlights graduates who have completed their degree within the past 10 years and have distinguished themselves professionally in their field of study. Jeromin received her award during the College’s annual scholarship awards ceremony held October 24.

Jeromin is the Chief Meteorologist at WFFF/WVNY, the Fox and ABC affiliates in Burlington, Vt. She is a Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and is the lead forecaster on four nightly newscasts for all of Vermont, northern New York, metro Montreal area, and interior New Hampshire. Jeromin worked as a meteorologist at BestSkiWeather.com and a research assistant at the Utah Department of Transportation before graduating from LSC.

Jeromin managed the planning and developing of the 22-minute documentary “Irene: In Our Own Words.” She and colleague Bob Conley wrote, edited, and shot the film after interviewing Vermont residents and business owners touched by Tropical Storm Irene. In conjunction with another colleague, Jeromin constructed an independent scientific survey to gauge the effectiveness of broadcast media in relaying critical information to the public. The data and conclusions were then presented at the Burlington National Weather Service office and several scientific conferences including the Northeastern Storm Conference and the 2012 American Meteorological Society (AMS) Broadcasters Conference.

Jeromin graduated from LSC with a B.S. in Meteorology in 2008. She is a frequent visitor to Burlington-area schools and is very active in community events. Jeromin makes an annual trip to give back to LSC by participating with the Weather Channel’s Jim Cantore in the day-long “TV Weathercasting Techniques” workshop. The class gives senior broadcast-concentration Atmospheric Sciences students the opportunity to be mentored, coached, and critiqued by Cantore and Jeromin. This year, the two included a discussion on the process of finding that first broadcast job and tips on becoming successful during their morning presentation.

Kerrin notes “I have set the [alumni] award up proudly at my place. It’s a nice reminder to continue to work hard!” Her interests include travel, snowboarding, hiking, theatrical production, and acting. Jeromin is a member of the American Meteorological Society.